101 things to do with Soak | 026 The bright red canoe

Author: Ngoc

One of our customers sent us these fun photos from her latest weekend at the cottage. Feeling refreshed and ambitious, she decided pull out the canoe that hasn’t been used in far too long, and spend the evening out on the water.


With every intention of pulling out the big red canoe and dropping it in the water, she came upon a small hiccup. After being stored away for years and years, the canoe had collected a good amount of dust, dirt, mud, cobwebs and many tiny little critters.

Taking a look at all her cleaning supplies available at the cottage, she decided that she really didn’t want to put any of those cleaning solutions into the same water that she would be swimming in. So instead, she grabbed her favorite bottle of Soak in the nice fresh citrus scent. Soak is gentle and biodegradable so she felt assured that it wouldn’t be toxic to herself, or the friendly ducks that have joined her in the lake.

 

Using a sponge, Soak, and some elbow grease, she got her bright red canoe into tip top form.

 

Do you have a fun Soak story? Send in your Soak experiences to ngoc@soakwash.com. We’d love to hear from you!

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101 things to do with Soak | 025 Pantyhose, stockings, fishnets and garters

Author: Ngoc

I can’t decide whether I love or hate hosiery. I love that they make my legs look gloriously smooth and even, and add that finishing touch to an outfit. I don’t enjoy how often I get pulls in them.


If I’m wearing stockings to an important event (meeting the in-laws, or to a job interview) I’ll often bring an extra pair because I know more often than not, I will walk into a rough surface and get a nice pull right down the front of them. Their delicate material means that you have to be gentle when washing them to ensure they last for another wear. Thowing them directly in the washing machine can leave you with a tangled mess of stretched out hosiery.

I recommend hand washing them in warm water in your sink or your Phil wash basin.

Directions

1. Fill up your sink and add one teaspoon of Soak to your water.

2. Make sure you remove any rings or bracelets that may catch while you are hand washing.

3. Turn your hosiery inside out just incase there is lint stuck in the toe. You should wash your garters in a separate wash to avoid the clasps or any embellishments from catching on the hosiery.

4. Leave to soak for 15 mins and gently squeeze out the water. Roll them in a towel and lay flat to dry. Hanging them may cause them to stretch.

Some hosiery tips

  • If you get a small unnoticable pull, you can use clear nail polish and brush over the run to help prevent it from growing in size.
  • When using the washroom, make a conscious effort to ensure that your skirt/dress is NOT tucked into the your pantyhose.
  • There are many fun crafts for kids that use old pairs of panty hose so if you have a young one at home, perhaps you can have some craft time and make a chia pet.

101 things to do with Soak | 023 Dog baths

Author: Ngoc
Smells like wet dog. A wonderful ‘Aquae’ smelling wet dog that is.

We always get emails and hear stories from our customers about how they reach for a bottle of Soak when it’s time to bathe their dog.

I have a Shih Tzu named Toby who is a little furry terror but is so cute and affectionate that it’s hard not to love him. He has a strong hatred of baths and will hide for hours in an attempt to avoid one. I swear I just have to think about giving him a bath and he’ll take off and hide under the couch.

He runs around the house while I run after him shaking his bag of treats to try to bribe/trick him. This has never worked but I am still hopeful. Once I finally catch him and put him in the tub, he’ll do anything to try to get out. This creates a big wet mess. He eventually gives up and just stands there looking at me with his unimpressed eyes. If this is anything like bath time with your furry friend, perhaps adding some Soak to the mix will make it slightly more pleasant. I know my favorite part of the whole ordeal is that when it’s all over, my hands are soft and smell like Aquae.

One of our loyal customers, who also happens to be Chris’s mom, sent us some wonderful photos of her bathing her beloved friend, Jenna. Jenna is a beautiful Rottweiler who is much better behaved during bath time than my mischievous Toby.
Jenna1

Jenna2

Jenna4
Please give your pup a good rinsing. Soak’s no-rinse properties are only effective when the item being washed is emersed and surrounded in water. I’m assuming that you aren’t soaking your pup in a giant basin of Soak and water. If you are however soaking your pup in a big giant basin, I’d like some pictures please.

Does your pup become extremely hyper and run around at lightning speeds after a bath? Does anyone know why this happens?


101 things to do with Soak | 022 RC car filters

Author: Jacqueline

Boys and their toys.


Rumor has it, my sweetie pie Ted’s friends were stealing their wives’ bottles of Soak. Crazy, I know, I didn’t believe it myself… until this past Saturday. Ted and his pals were at a radio control car race , as they often are on summer weekends. This particular weekend was of interest, because the track was half way between home and the cottage at Hardwood Ski and Bike. Interesting how, you ask? Well, it’s rather simple. I was able to spend time with the guys at the track and make it to the cottage for the balance of the weekend.the track

We were a couple of hours in; the pit was full of people working madly on their cars between races when one of the guys, Marco started asking for dish soap. Dish soap? Why on earth would they need that, there were no dishes to be found… just beer cans, junk food and barbecues. Before I could even ask why, Steve stood up and said, ‘Jacq- got any Soak?’ Well, as it turns out, the washing in question was for the foam car filters. Steve always said Soak was the best for degreasing the filters between races, I had just never witnessed the sacred washing event before.

I sent Marco off to my car, to the ever faithful Soak sales kit, consisting of bottles, mini-soaks and catalogs. It is, after all, my job to always have Soak on hand. A bottle of Citrus was secured, and before I could even say, someone pass me a camera, Marco had immersed the dirty foam filters in Soak and water. He was even resourceful enough to use an old zip lock parts package as his wash basin. No Carrie or Phil needed here.

After an undisclosed time frame (I told him they were soaked enough, but he insisted on soaking and squeezing them longer- he is passionate about how clean his filters need to be) the filters were removed and rinsed, ready to be reattached to the cars.

On the left, you’ll see a shiny, soft and round filter. On the right, a grease filled dirty one. We think this photo speaks for itself. So ladies, hold on to your bottle of Soak if you have RC racers in the family. Or, next time you order a bottle, buy one for your beau.
CLean and dirty filters

Oh, and for the technically inclined, the air filter keeps dirt out of the engine. It needs to be clean and oiled. When it gets dirty, dirt can start getting into engine. A dirty filter also restricts air flow to engine thus reducing power and making fuel consumption rise. So really, we’re cleaning out dirt and dirty oil. Pretty fancy!

PS.  No names were changed in the documentation of this event. Steve is really proud of how much he loves Soak. He also uses Soak to wash his rags after each and every event.


101 things to do with Soak | 018 Fabrics. Quilting. Pre-washing.

Author: Jacqueline

Truth be told, I love it more than yarn. I love looking at it, cutting it, designing with it, wearing it and resting under it. My mom was a clothing designer. I grew up with fabric. I’ve recently acquired an exceptional stash of Liberty of London fabrics from a recent trip to England.


My first thought was to introduce these limited edition fabrics from the V&A collection to my stash immediately, so the various prints, colours and textures could get to know each other. My fabric stash enjoys new friends. I also had a few select acquisitions from the Liberty store itself but I wanted to include some of them in my summer quilting projects. I knew what had to be done. They all needed to be unfolded from their neatly packed pile and given a good Soak.

There are some basic rules to pre-washing quilt fabrics. We’ve talked about pre-washing fabrics for textiles in general, but here, we’re talking quilting specifically. The liberty fabrics I bought at the V&A suggested cold water wash, and discouraged drying, ‘do not tumble dry’.

First, if you are making a quilt that is going to be used, like this one which was a wedding present for my cousins in the UK, at some point it is going to be washed.
Quilt1

Second, if a giant quilt gets wet, it is likely to end up in the dryer, regardless of instructions. So, I recommend pre-washing and drying all fabrics.

I did wash and dry my liberty prints, fear not, I’ll share my secrets.

First, unfold all your fat quarters, yardage and fabric.

fabrics

It is essential that the pieces be loose and relaxed when they go into the wash.

unfold fat quarters

If you have (or have access) to a front loader, I would suggest using it. The agitation caused by the upright machines does add a bit of roughness to the washing (and it tends to increase fraying).

Use cold water, and of course, Soak.

Nothing too crazy happens in the washing machine. Sometimes, you get a bit of fraying at the edges, but mostly you just end up with a tangled bunch of fabric swatches. It is imperative to separate and loosen all the pieces again, before they go in the dryer.

Drying is an important part of the washing process, arguably, the most important. For my machine at home, 6-9 minutes on medium heat is enough to dry cotton. I highly recommend not leaving the room during drying. Your goal, when drying fabric is to remove most of the moisture, while leaving the fabric slightly damp so you can take it out, flatten it and keep it from wrinkling. Clearly I left my liberty print too long, it wrinkled. I am not looking forward to the arduous ironing that will follow. Every fabric and every machine commands different drying times. Once again, grab your favorite craft magazine, say, the summer issue of Studio magazine, featuring Soak and hang out in the laundry room. Your fabric will love you for it.

wrinkles

I remove a few pieces at a time, fold them in half and flatten them out. The continuous movement and heat from the dryer keeps the cotton soft and wrinkle free. If the dryer finishes and the cottons remain still, they will wrinkle. I suspect Liberty suggests not drying, to avoid wrinkling and the countless hours that follow, should one choose to try to iron the wrinkles out.

Here is my stack of fat quarters after I took it out of the machine. Note the small amount of fraying that occurred along the edges.

fraying

When I get my fabrics back upstairs, I drape them over chairs and other firm objects, to air dry.

drying

Once dry, my fabrics were transferred to the stash where they took great comfort in all the other prints. Some were cut up for my summer project, as I mentioned, and more importantly, the rest are ready to go on a moments notice. There’s nothing worse than wanting to start a new quilt and knowing you have to do laundry first. That’s how unwashed fabric ends up in quilts. It’s never pretty, so wash new fabrics immediately for safe keeping.

Distracted by the liberty prints? Find them in Canada at Hyggeligt. Your local home for liberty prints. Both online and in a store front in London, Ontario, Hyggeligt is a haven for fantastic prints. I’m grateful that some of my chosen prints can be found there. I will never be without liberty again. Oh, and if you pass through, they also now stock Soak!
libertyend

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101 things to do with Soak | 016 When the tag says “wash separately”

Author: Ngoc

Don’t you love when the tag says “wash separately”? Throwing it in with the rest of your laundry could result in excess dye staining the rest of your clothing, but washing it alone in the machine just seems wasteful. This is my dilemma with red shirts. I love red t-shirts. I don’t love how many of them run the first time you wash them.


I have a cousin who only likes fans and vacuums. ‘Likes’ is a fairly modest word, obsessed might be more suitable. He’s loved them since he was 3 (that was almost 10 years ago) and carries them everywhere. He lives in the States and every time he comes to visit, you can be sure that he’ll bring along at least 3 fans and a vacuum. You can also count on the fact that he’ll vacuum your home when he visits. When he walked down the aisle at my aunt’s wedding as a ring bearer, he had a pillow in one hand and a fan in the other. He called and informed me that he’d be coming to visit on his birthday. So what do you get a kid who only loves 2 things? Well I decided to get him t-shirts with pictures of vacuums and fans on them.
My aunt and uncle modelling the shirts. 

I didn’t want his mom to curse me later on if she accidentally threw the brand new red shirt in with the rest of his laundry and turned everything pink. So I handwashed with some Soak to remove most of the excess dye and give it a nice light aquae scent. It took me about 4 washes before the water stopped coming out bright red. 

Even after the second rinse, the water was still coming out bright red. This could have resulted in many pairs of pink tinted socks.

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101 things you can do with Soak | 015 Sequins

Author: Ngoc

Shiny sparkly flashy sequins. There’s just something about sequins that calls to me. I’m attracted to them the same way an insect moves towards that pretty blue light.


I’ll walk into a store and just naturally gravitate towards things that sparkle and shine. No matter how tacky the piece is, I’ll pick it up and whisper to myself, “ooooo pretty!” Now a lot of people avoid buying sequined apparel, or buy it and never wear it because of the hassles involved with washing it afterwards. Well I’m here to tell you to stop holding back!

I tried washing a few different sequined shirts in Soak and they all came out beautifully. I checked the care tags and they all said that you could hand wash in cold water or dry clean. I’d recommend checking your tags for instructions but if it can get wet, then it can be washed in Soak. I tested several different shirts made of different materials. I had silk, polyester, cotton, and sheer chiffon.

I filled my basin with cool water and left my darks and lights to soak separately. Sometimes the sequins are not sewn on tightly so being able to leave it to soak without all the extra agitation helps to keep the sequins on your clothing, where they belong.

Squeeze gently to remove excess water. Be careful to not squish or bend any of the sequins. Lay flat or hang to dry. Avoid the dryer as the high heat can melt, distort or discolor the sequins.